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10 Health Benefits of Turmeric Tea You Should Know

Turmeric tea is a warm liquid mixture of ground, freshly sliced, or grated turmeric. Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a yellow-orange spice belong to the ginger family. It is widely used in sauces and curries. The active ingredient in turmeric is curcumin, which has been known for its medicinal, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties. You can consume turmeric in many forms, but drinking turmeric tea is believed to be the most effective way to reap the health benefits of the spice.

Health Benefits of Turmeric Tea

The antioxidants properties in turmeric tea can provide a variety of health benefits. Turmeric’s most potent ingredient is curcumin. However, it has a low bioavailability, and the body does not absorb it well. Piperine is an alkaloid present in black pepper. This nitrogenous organic compound in black pepper can increase its absorption by 2000%. Therefore, it is important to add a pinch of black pepper to your cup of turmeric tea in order to increase its absorption. Here are 10 potential health benefits of turmeric tea.

  1. May Prevent Cancer: The curcumin in turmeric tea is an efficient anticarcinogen or a substance that helps prevent cancer causing inflammations in the body. (1)
  2. Boosts the Immune System: The medicinal properties in turmeric tea can boost immune system in individuals with immune disorders. (2)
  3. Eases Arthritis Symptoms: The powerful anti-inflammatory properties of turmeric tea can help relieve arthritis related inflammation in individuals who are suffering. (3)
  4. Lowers Cholesterol: Turmeric can reduce LDL (bad) cholesterol and can lower your likelihood of developing critical conditions, including heart disease and stroke. (4)
  5. Prevents Alzheimer’s Disease: The antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of curcumin in turmeric tea can prevent the inflammation that is causing neurodegenerative diseases. (5)
  6. Prevents Irritable Bowel Syndrome: curcumin in turmeric can help decrease IBS-related pain and enhance the quality of life in people with this condition. (6)
  7. Protects the Liver: Curumin’s potential liver and gallbladder benefits include increasing digestive fluid, bile output, and also protect the liver cells from bile-associated chemical damage. (7)
  8. Prevents Diabetes: The curcumin in turmeric tea may have the potential to treat diabetes. (8)
  9. Prevents Heart Disease: Several studies have shown that curcumin antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds have positive cardiac health benefits. (9)
  10. Treats Lung Disease: The anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in turmeric tea may help decrease the symptoms of chronic pulmonary conditions. (10)

health benefits of turmeric tea
You can make turmeric tea by steeping powdered, freshly sliced, or grated turmeric.

Dosage

There is no specific recommended dosage of turmeric. Most of the studies conducted on turmeric have used 1 gram of curcumin daily. Keep in mind that each 3 grams of turmeric powder contains 1 gram of curcumin and up to 3 grams of turmeric is safe to take daily.

Side Effects

Drinking turmeric tea is safe in moderate quantities. However, taking too much turmeric can cause side effects. These include blood-thinning effects, which can increase the risk of bleeding and stomach acidity. People who are on diabetes and heart disease medication should not drink turmeric tea. Because it may interact with other medication, which can lower your blood sugar and blood pressure. While there is no proof to back up this claim, some people believe turmeric might cause labor contractions during pregnancy. Pregnant women should avoid turmeric tea or see the doctor before consuming it. Turmeric may also increase in bile output if consumed in large quantities, which can be problematic for people who have bile duct blockages, gallstones, or liver disease. Again, if you have or had any of these diseases, ask your doctor about drinking turmeric tea.



How to Make Turmeric Tea?

  1. Boil 3 cups of water.
  2. Add and stir 2 teaspoons of turmeric. 
  3. Add a pinch of black pepper.
  4. Simmer for 5 to 10 minutes.
  5. Strain the tea into a different container.
  6. Add honey, freshly squeezed lemon juice, or orange juice totally optional.

You can also make golden milk by mixing turmeric and other spices such as cinnamon and ginger with cow or plant-based milk. For more information, read about health benefits of golden milk.

Conclusion

Turmeric tea has potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties that are thought to ease pain and inflammation in the body. Inflammation is the key factor for chronic diseases. That is said the less inflammation, the lower risk of diseases. The main active compound in turmeric is curcumin. For thousands of years, they have used curcumin as a natural medicine to treat many conditions. However, people who have diabetes or are taking blood thinners should speak with their doctor before trying any turmeric or curcumin tea or supplements.



References

  1. Therapeutic applications of curcumin for patients with pancreatic cancer. World J Gastroenterol. 2014.
  2. Curcumin and tumor immune-editing: resurrecting the immune system. Cell Div. 2015.
  3. Curcumin: a new paradigm and therapeutic opportunity for the treatment of osteoarthritis: curcumin for osteoarthritis management. Springerplus. 2013.
  4. “Spicing up” of the immune system by curcumin. J Clin Immunol. 2007.
  5. Turmeric Extract May Improve Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptomology in Otherwise Healthy Adults: A Pilot Study. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2005.
  6. Effects of curcumin on the gastric emptying of albino rats. Indian J Physiol Pharmacol. 2012.
  7. Turmeric extract and its active compound, curcumin, protect against chronic CCl4-induced liver damage by enhancing antioxidation. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2016.
  8. Curcumin and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prevention and Treatment. Nutrients. 2019.
  9. The protective role of curcumin in cardiovascular diseases. Int J Cardiol. 2009.
  10. Curcumin use in pulmonary diseases: State of the art and future perspectives. Pharmacol Res. 2017.


Terms of Use: The information on this website is provided for educational purposes only and is not intended to provide personal medical advice. If you have questions about a medical condition, consult your doctor or another qualified health provider. Never ignore professional medical advice because of something you have read on this website. The Nutrition Source on this website makes no product recommendations or endorsements.

Naeem Durrani BSchttps://defatx.com/
I am a freelance health and wellness writer. My interests include medical research, and the scientific evidence around effective wellness practices, which empower people to transform their lives.
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